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Apple celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day on homepage, with quote about Vietnam War

From 9to5mac.com


Today is Martin Luther King Jr. Day, and as usual Apple is commemorating the occasion by devoting its homepage to a photo and quotation. The company also provides a link to a free copy of the book Strive Toward Freedom.

This year’s quote comes from a speech Dr. King gave in 1967 about the need to speak up against the Vietnam War …

The quote is:

This is no time for apathy or complacency. This is a time for vigorous and positive action.

It’s an excerpt from a speech made on April 4, 1967, in which Dr. King argued that the war was not only diverting funds from anti-poverty work but also disproportionately sending young Black men to their deaths.

A few years ago there was a shining moment in that struggle. It seemed as if there was a real promise of hope for the poor — both black and white — through the poverty program. There were experiments, hopes, new beginnings. Then came the buildup in Vietnam and I watched the program broken and eviscerated as if it were some idle political plaything of a society gone mad on war, and I knew that America would never invest the necessary funds or energies in rehabilitation of its poor so long as adventures like Vietnam continued to draw men and skills and money like some demonic destructive suction tube. So I was increasingly compelled to see the war as an enemy of the poor and to attack it as such. 

Perhaps the more tragic recognition of reality took place when it became clear to me that the war was doing far more than devastating the hopes of the poor at home. It was sending their sons and their brothers and their husbands to fight and to die in extraordinarily high proportions relative to the rest of the population. We were taking the black young men who had been crippled by our society and sending them eight thousand miles away to guarantee liberties in Southeast Asia which they had not found in southwest Georgia and East Harlem. So we have been repeatedly faced with the cruel irony of watching Negro and white boys on TV screens as they kill and die together for a nation that has been unable to seat them together in the same schools. So we watch them in brutal solidarity burning the huts of a poor village, but we realize that they would never live on the same block in Detroit. I could not be silent in the face of such cruel manipulation of the poor.

King said that his own insistence on non-violent protest became a tougher sell when America was itself using violence an an attempt to bring about social and political change.

As I have walked among the desperate, rejected and angry young men I have told them that Molotov cocktails and rifles would not solve their problems. I have tried to offer them my deepest compassion while maintaining my conviction that social change comes most meaningfully through nonviolent action. But they asked — and rightly so — what about Vietnam? They asked if our own nation wasn’t using massive doses of violence to solve its problems, to bring about the changes it wanted. 

He said it’s not just that the time for change is always now, but that inaction is itself a choice, and a dangerous one. Here’s a longer version of the quote Apple chose:

We are now faced with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history there is such a thing as being too late.

Procrastination is still the thief of time. Life often leaves us standing bare, naked and dejected with a lost opportunity. The “tide in the affairs of men” does not remain at the flood; it ebbs. We may cry out desperately for time to pause in her passage, but time is deaf to every plea and rushes on. Over the bleached bones and jumbled residue of numerous civilizations are written the pathetic words: “Too late.”

There is an invisible book of life that faithfully records our vigilance or our neglect. “The moving finger writes, and having writ moves on…” We still have a choice today; nonviolent coexistence or violent co-annihilation.

You can download the free book here, and listen to the speech below.


The post Apple celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day on homepage, with quote about Vietnam War first appeared on 9to5mac.com

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Apple celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day on homepage, with quote about Vietnam War

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Apple celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day on homepage, with quote about Vietnam WarApple celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day on homepage, with quote about Vietnam War

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