From bgr.com

The iPhone 12 brought back the iconic iPhone 4 design, and Apple kept the flat edge chassis in place for three generations, through the iPhone 14. But according to one leaker, the iPhone 15 might move away from the flat-edged design. Even more interesting is the claim that Apple will use titanium for the iPhone 15 chassis.

A leaker who goes by the name of ShrimpApplePro said on Twitter that the iPhone 15 will have a “new border design.” The leaker said that the corners and edges of the phone will be rounded, allowing Apple to transition more smoothly to the rear camera module.

ShrimpApplePro has a mixed track record, though he has been the source of several accurate Apple leaks in the past.

Still have a back glass btw

Personally i think this design will create a really beautiful edge transition from the back to the camera bump https://t.co/VcXQaI4MDx

— ShrimpApplePro 🍤 (@VNchocoTaco) November 21, 2022

The leaker said the material might be titanium but cautioned that it’s an early rumor. The iPhone 15’s back will still be glass. After all, the iPhone needs to support wireless charging, especially the MagSafe variety. For that, Apple needs to use glass on the back.

This particular leaker has posted plenty of iPhone rumors in the past, offering accurate information about Apple’s unannounced plans. Like the iPhone 14 battery capacity sizes he leaked before Apple unveiled the new handsets.

Apple has several months to make changes to the iPhone 15’s design before manufacturing begins. Not to mention that not all iPhone rumors pan out.

A design change makes sense for the iPhone 15, even if these claims are inaccurate. Apple generally sticks with an iPhone design for about three years, and the iPhone 14 may have just concluded that cycle.

iPhone 14 Pro’s Lightning port. Image source: Christian de Looper for BGR

Also, as exciting as that iPhone 4 design revival might be, the iPhone 14’s flat sides make it harder to grip than the iPhone X/XS/11 design. Rounded rear edges might be a better fit in the user’s hand. The phone’s rear side might feature a curvature similar to the 2021 MacBook Pro, seen below. But that’s just speculation.

As for the switch to titanium, this isn’t the first time we have heard such a claim. But previous reports said that only the more expensive iPhone 15 models might get titanium instead of stainless steel. Apple using titanium on the cheaper iPhone 15 and 15 Plus would be a big win for customers.

Older rumors said Apple wanted to use titanium for the iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max chassis, but ended up using stainless steel. The advantage of titanium is that it’s quite durable but weighs less. It’s also scratch resistant compared to stainless steel.

Apple MacBook Pro (2021) side view.
Apple MacBook Pro (2021) side view.

The problem with titanium is that it’s harder to manufacture. But, as MacRumors points out, Apple has patented technology covering ways to manufacture titanium enclosures. And it has patents on how to give titanium cases a high-gloss surface finish. Apple has also been looking at ways to reduce the appearance of fingerprints.

Moreover, Apple has experience making device cases out of titanium. The Apple Watch Ultra is such a device. The iPhone 15 models, or some of them, could very well be next.


More Apple coverage: Check out the best Apple deals online right now.

The post iPhone 15 might feature a titanium chassis and curved back first appeared on bgr.com

New reasons to get excited everyday.

Get the latest tech news delivered right in your mailbox


5 Reasons Why You Should Try Online Horse Race Betting

In many places around the world, horse races are an attraction that a lot of people love to watch. With the fast-paced action and thrill that each game provides, it is no longer surprising to know that millions of fans have grown fond of it.

NordLayer — more than a business VPN

Cybersecurity threats have become vast and more sophisticated. The rate of malware attacks and malicious activity counts within seconds despite the size or sector the organization belongs to — no one is safe enough to expect that foe actors will bypass vital company resources.


You may also like

Subscribe
Notify of
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

More in Apple