From bgr.com

LG might be the biggest name in OLED, even compared to Samsung and Sony. The company has consistently put out some of the best OLED screens for years. From televisions to phones to gaming monitors, it’s hard to find a bad LG OLED display.

Of course, televisions are probably where the company is most well-known for its OLED screens. Personally, I went with Sony’s OLED technology, but even I recognize how good LG’s OLED TVs are. My friend has a 77-inch G Series and that thing looks incredible. The difference at that level has less to do with quality and more about personal preference — at least when I’m looking at them.

Now, the company is looking to take its OLED television technology in a new direction. At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), LG unveiled the new T Series, an OLED TV that is — get this — completely transparent. As reported by Chris Welch from The Verge, the company plans on actually launching this new television to consumers later this year. That’s a big deal since most transparent displays up to this point — regardless of the company — have been prototypes rather than an actual product you could buy.

According to Welch, the LG T Series comes in at 77 inches and boasts 4K resolution — not surprising. I wouldn’t have expected the company to jump to something like 8K right off the bat, especially with this completely new technology. Just like the company’s new wireless OLED televisions, the T Series also supports the company’s Zero Connect Box, which removes the need to have any cables connected to the TV itself.

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As you can see from the video below, the T Series can show off a picture in transparent mode, which features some pretty convincing depth effects. Or, if you want to watch TV normally, you can turn on a contrast film that mimics the deep blacks of an OLED. While the picture’s brightness, contrast, and detail aren’t as good as LG’s non-transparent OLEDs, I wouldn’t expect it to be.

LG says that the OLED T Series will go on sale for customers later this year, but the company has not released pricing just yet. I’m sure it’s going to cost a ton. While it’s an awesome technology, I have a feeling that the only people who will pick this up — at least right away — are those who want to make a statement that they have it…because they can.

The unveiling of the T Series comes a week after LG also announced the rest of its OLED lineup, which includes the company’s new 65-inch Signature OLED M4 wireless TV. The new 65-inch model joins the current 97-inch model so, if you wanted a wireless TV but didn’t want a monster that takes up the whole wall, 2024 is the year for you. Both feature the company’s Zero Connect Box, which removes the need to have any cables connected to the TV itself. LG also says that the OLED M4 is the “world’s first TV with wireless video and audio transmission at up to 4K 144Hz.”

LG M4 OLED TV
LG’s new AI-powered M4 OLED TV is shown mounted on a living room wall. Image source: LG

Getting away from OLED, LG is also showing off its new Mini LED televisions at CES this week. The company already announced its new 98-inch QNED television last month, revealing a new α8 AI processor that boasts “a 1.3-fold increase in AI performance, a 2.3-fold enhancement in graphic performance, and a processing speed that is 1.6 times faster.” The new QNEDs also feature the company’s AI Picture Pro and Dynamic Tone Mapping Pro picture technology as well as virtual 9.1.2 surround sound.

LG’s new transparent OLED TV looks bananas, but who will actually buy it?

If you happen to be in Las Vegas, you should be able to check out all of LG’s new television lineup this week. Otherwise, you can expect all of the models to start hitting retail stores starting this spring.

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The post LG’s new transparent OLED TV looks bananas, but who will actually buy it? first appeared on bgr.com

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