From www.androidcentral.com

A press render of the Nothing Phone 2a in black.

(Image credit: Nothing)

What you need to know

  • Nothing’s Phone 2a was officially revealed, including a Mediatek Dimensity 7200 Pro processor, a 120Hz AMOLED display, and a dual-camera system.
  • Phone 2a will only be available in the U.S. through the Nothing Developer Program, where it will retail for $349. 
  • You can pre-order the Nothing Phone 2a starting today in the UK and India, among other global markets.

Nothing officially revealed the Nothing Phone 2a on Tuesday, a budget Android phone that aims to compete heavily in global markets. The smartphone ships with impressive specs, including a MediaTek Dimensity 7200 Pro processor, a 120Hz AMOLED display, and a dual-camera system. However, you can’t buy it in the U.S. unless you pay $349 as part of the Nothing Developer Program. 

The company co-developed the Dimensity 7200 Pro processor that powers the Nothing Phone 2a with MediaTek, using its 4nm process. It’s an eight-core chip that can reach clock speeds of up to 2.8 GHz. That puts the Phone 2a ahead of the Phone 1, which ran on the Qualcomm Snapdragon 778G+ platform, at least on paper. It can be paired with either 8GB or 12GB of physical RAM and uses extra virtual RAM via “RAM Booster.” This feature allows Nothing to allocate up to 20GB of Phone 2a storage as RAM.

Another impressive part of the Nothing Phone 2a, given the price point, is the phone’s display. It uses a 6.7-inch AMOLED panel with variable refresh rate support between 30Hz and 120Hz. The display can also reach 1,300 nits of peak brightness and sustains an average of 700 nits. Nothing also says it has the slimmest bezels of any Nothing Phone, measuring 2.1mm around the display. That makes for a screen-to-body ratio of over 91%.

A press render for the Nothing Phone 2a in white.

(Image credit: Nothing)

Phone 2a has a dual-camera system on a rear headlined by a 50MP Samsung GN9 main sensor with an f/1.88 aperture. There’s also an ultrawide, 50MP Samsung JN1 sensor with a 114-degree field of view. On the front, the Phone 2a includes a 32MP Sony IMX615 sensor. 

For power, Nothing put a 5,000 mAh battery inside the Phone 2a. It supports 45W fast charging as well when that runs out. 

Phone 2a runs on Nothing OS 2.5, which is based on Android 14. The company promises three years of full OS upgrades and four years of security updates. With Nothing OS, you get the features that come with the Phone 2a’s Glyph Interface. There are fewer and smaller light strips on the Phone 2a than its flagship counterparts, but the neat design feature is still present on Nothing’s budget phone.

Nothing says that “most global customers” will be able to pre-order the Phone 2a starting today. However, it’s only available in the U.S. through the Nothing Developer Program for a $349 fee. In the UK, Nothing is selling Phone 2a in-person at its flagship retail store, Nothing Store Soho. It’ll also be available through select third-party retailers in the UK in India.

The Nothing Phone 2a base model, with 8GB RAM and 128GB of storage, retails for £319 in the UK. The upgraded version, with 12GB RAM and 256GB of storage, sells for £349. In India, the base model is priced at 23,999₹ and the highest-end model costs 27,999₹.

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Brady is a tech journalist covering news at Android Central. He has spent the last two years reporting and commenting on all things related to consumer technology for various publications. Brady graduated from St. John’s University in 2023 with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. When he isn’t experimenting with the latest tech, you can find Brady running or watching sports.

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The post Nothing finally launches Phone 2a, but you can’t buy it in the US first appeared on www.androidcentral.com

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