From www.techradar.com

The Samsung Galaxy Ring sitting on a pale surface

(Image credit: Samsung)

As we get closer to the full launch of the Samsung Galaxy Ring, we’re slowly learning more about its many talents – and some fresh rumors suggest these could include planning meals to improve your diet.

According to the Korean site Chosun Biz (via GSMArena), Samsung plans to integrate the Galaxy Ring with its new Samsung Food app, launched in August 2023

Samsung calls this app an “AI-powered food and recipe platform”, as it can whip up tailored meal plans and even give you step-by-step guides to making specific dishes. The exact integration with the Galaxy Ring isn’t clear, but according to the Korean site, the wearable will help make dietary suggestions based on your calorie consumption and body mass index (BMI).

The ultimate aim is apparently to integrate this system with smart appliances (made by Samsung, of course) like refrigerators and ovens. While they aren’t yet widely available, appliances like Samsung Bespoke 4-Door Flex Refrigerator and Bespoke AI Oven include cameras that can design or cook recipes based on your dietary needs.

It sounds like the Galaxy Ring, and presumably smartwatches like the incoming Galaxy Watch 7 series, are the missing links in a system that can monitor your health and feed that info into the Samsung Food app, which you can download now for Android and iOS.

The Ring’s role in this process will presumably be more limited than smartwatches, whose screens can help you log meals and more. But the rumors hint at how big Samsung’s ambitions are for its long-awaited ring, which will be a strong new challenger in our best smart rings guide when it lands (most likely in July).

Hungry for data

A phone on a grey background showing the Samsung Food app

(Image credit: Samsung)

During our early hands-on with the Galaxy Ring, it was clear that Samsung is mostly focusing on its sleep-tracking potential. It goes beyond Samsung’s smartwatches here, offering unique insights including night movement, resting heart rate during sleep, and sleep latency (the time it takes to fall asleep).

Get the hottest deals available in your inbox plus news, reviews, opinion, analysis and more from the TechRadar team.

But Samsung has also talked up the Galaxy Ring’s broader health potential more recently. It’ll apparently be able to generate a My Vitality Score in Samsung’s Health app (by crunching together data like your activity and heart rate) and eventually integrate with appliances like smart fridges.

This means it’s no surprise to hear that the Galaxy Ring could also play nice with the Samsung Food app. That said, the ring’s hardware limitations mean this will likely be a minor feature initially, as its tracking is more focused on sleep and exercise. 

We’re actually more excited about the Ring’s potential to control our smart home than integrate with appliances like smart ovens, but more features are never a bad thing – as long as you’re happy to give up significant amounts of health data to Samsung.

You might also like

Mark is TechRadar’s Senior news editor. Having worked in tech journalism for a ludicrous 17 years, Mark is now attempting to break the world record for the number of camera bags hoarded by one person. He was previously Cameras Editor at both TechRadar and Trusted Reviews, Acting editor on Stuff.tv, as well as Features editor and Reviews editor on Stuff magazine. As a freelancer, he’s contributed to titles including The Sunday Times, FourFourTwo and Arena. And in a former life, he also won The Daily Telegraph’s Young Sportswriter of the Year. But that was before he discovered the strange joys of getting up at 4am for a photo shoot in London’s Square Mile. 

[ For more curated Samsung news, check out the main news page here]

The post Samsung Galaxy Ring could help cook up AI-powered meal plans to boost your diet first appeared on www.techradar.com

New reasons to get excited everyday.



Get the latest tech news delivered right in your mailbox

You may also like

Subscribe
Notify of
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments